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October 23, 2016 02:54AM
Tessa:

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Did Elizabeth, Jane, Bingley and Darcy even spoke to each other and amongst themselves? If Jane she already knew what was troubling Elizabeth and was only too aware of the talk of the town concerning Darcy, why didn't she try to establish the facts from her husband? Bingley could not be blind to the source of Elizabeth's moroseness. Why didn't he talk to his good friend Darcy?

But the dumbest - in more sense than one - of them all was Darcy. Surely, surely he could not be deaf to the loud whispers about him and Miss Cornish and blind to how all this might affect the woman to whom he had declared undying devotion?

What Jane knows is that Elizabeth wants to leave because of Darcy. She hasn't heard anything concerning Miss Jarling. And since Darcy and Elizabeth were only supposed to be "friends," it's not like he doesn't have the right to go court another lady if he wants to. Bingley and Jane are certainly very concerned, but Elizabeth hasn't confided in them or asked for their help, so it's really none of their business. It's possible (implied) that Bingley might have asked Darcy what he did to upset Elizabeth now, and that's why they were arguing, but of course Darcy would say "nothing."

And the thing about rumours is that though people may talk behind your back, they're not likely to repeat it to your face.

gio:

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Argh, all the lost opportunities for their big blowout! The Bingleys should just lock both D&E in a room so they can have it out and come to an understanding. Lizzy is leaving soon, will Darcy get the chance to catch her before she leaves?

It's possible. smiling smiley

Kent:

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Elizabeth cut him loose time and again -- if her feelings and desires have changed, she's never told him. So if she is upset about Miss Cornish to the point of treating Darcy in such a shoddy manner, Darcy has a right to be angry at her capriciousness.

The other business about Miss DeBourgh is just a web of preposterous nonsense which Elizabeth can cut through in a minute with a simple question to Darcy; which of course makes it impenetrable. This Elizabeth seems not much of a communicator.

Hopefully, Darcy can keep his dignity in tact and leave her alone in Hertfordshire to stew in her own juice. Eventually a happy accident will occur to tell her the truth, and she will try to make it up to Darcy.

I kind of hope he won't have her after this. Miss Cornish is looking not so bad these days.

Well, if it's any comfort, Elizabeth's opinions are going to be very similar to yours here shortly. You're right that she's not much of a communicator, a fact she will come to rue. Although it would be very difficult, at that time, for a single woman to question a single man about that kind of thing, she would definitely have done better to have talked to someone, any one, about this. It's not only his supposed engagement, but also the whole thing with Miss Jarling. Unfortunately for Darcy, his behavior with Miss Cornish is just appearing to confirm all these allegations.

Karentea:

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Elizabeth certainly has trust issues. Which, I think, is based on her inability to truly forgive him for his initial slight. She claims all her friends understand why she wants to leave, but I think even Jane doesn't really understand. So much for being confidantes.

Darcy is understandably angry. They have agreed to be friends, & Elizabeth has encouraged the friendship, even stringing him along by flirting with him, when wham! she turns cold & unfriendly. And every attempt he makes to find out why, she rebuffs him.

In a sense, she just "threw him down the stairs".

I love this! You totally got the parallel I was trying to create. And, like, Elizabeth's fall down the stairs, it's gonna hurt!

JanetR:

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I want to yell, "just talk, everybody!" I'm glad that, when this is a completed story and I'm re-reading it as a whole, this chapter will be merely one short blip near the middle. Everyone is so frustrating.

"separate and yet near"
You do have a vivid way with words!

Yah, I'm not going to draw this out the way some writers might. It's not a long enough story for that. I don't even wait until the last few lines to get them together this time!

How awkward to have a fight while you're waltzing, don't you think? Physically, it was as close and intimate as an unrelated man and a woman would get, but emotionally there's this hug distance at the same time.

LizzyS:

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Lizzy is thinking she was wronged and, probably more importantly I think, disappointed in Darcy, which I still maintain there has to be some valid excuse for Jarling and everything else unless you intend to make this Mr. Darcy a rake. If he was a rake I expect he would have moved on and doubt he would have gotten as angry as he did. She is still showing her stubborn streak. If she would just stop and listen/let him explain/ask gentle probing questions, things might have gone smoother from the start.

Then there is Darcy. Poor man has no clue what's going on, even if I feel he is a bit clueless to miss the whole Miss Cornish fiasco that is brewing. Then again even Austen seemed to poke fun at the ton when Darcy told Caroline how females minds jump from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment.

There seem to be a few days before they leave. Will Darcy manage to get her alone, will Jane and Charles get them talking (I liked one suggestion to put them in a room and let them go at it), will he come to Longbourn, will he join them on the trip and something happens to the carriage?

This has the potential to get worse before it gets better. It seems like they both have had their Hunsford moment, but they haven't had it out yet. Will they say things they regret this time around too?

You've got a lot of good ideas here. Elizabeth hasn't had her Hunsford just yet, but it's coming. Darcy is definitely clueless, and Elizabeth is definitely stubborn!

terachan:

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Now I know who I'd hug: Darcy. His anger is justified. He doesn't know that Elizabeth's feelings are changed. From his point of view, she's cold, then warm, and then cold again. Elizabeth definitely needs her Hunsford moment.
Lovely chapter, as always.

She does, doesn't she? Thanks!

SabineC:

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Yikes.
"Till this moment, I never knew myself" is bound to become a very apt description indeed.

Yup.

Bubbleblue:

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Thank you for the update, which was the perfect end to a terrifying work week.

Love your work and can't wait for what comes next!

Thank you! I'm sorry your week was terrifying.

Devries:

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Omg can't wait for the next one, please please hurry up

Monday. smiling smiley

SarahC:

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As painful as all this is, I am glad that Darcy is finally pushing back a little at Elizabeth's behavior. From his standpoint, she is being terribly unfair, snubbing him like this with no reason that he knows of--and she is being unfair to not even think to ask for his side of the story. I can understand that she's hurt and angry but really, what possible reason could Darcy have for faking his attachment to her? Surely not even she would think that even Darcy, as she now believes him to be, would try to seduce Bingley's sister-in-law while she's actually staying in Bingley's house and even before, if Darcy really were so dishonorable, he would not possibly have been so remorseful over his actions and deferred so much to her early on in the Season to make her change her mind about him. Someone who cared only for himself wouldn't have put himself through such mortification to atone for a wrong he had done. I didn't really think it was possible but I am really starting to doubt Elizabeth's intelligence and good sense. In canon, Darcy had never given her any reason to think well of him so it made it understandable that she'd be more inclined to believe Wickham.

Can't wait for more!! This is driving me crazy!

You're right that there's a lot here that doesn't make sense. And I think Elizabeth realizes, at least on some level, that it doesn't make sense, but she just doesn't know how to deny what seems to be undeniable evidence against him. But I think she'd be having an easier time of it if it did make more perfect sense, if she could see all the proof she needed in his current behaviour. Because she can't she still keeps having these feelings of guilt, of attraction to him and pity for him, and it's making her thoroughly miserable.

Gioia:

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I found myself bawling through the waltz and garden scenes. Even knowing that Elizabeth has misunderstood some things and interpreted others in the worst possible light, I couldn't help but hurt right along with her. You did a marvelous job depicting a gaping, cavernous, black hole of misery within her. I also understand why she feels incapable of putting that sort of despairing anguish into words when she is repeatedly asked by her loved ones what is wrong.

Yet, I also feel she is wrong not to at least attempt to seek counsel from Mrs. Gardiner or Jane, as her hostesses. Jane & Bingley in particular deserve to be told what is distressing her so greatly while she is under their protection and a guest in their home, especially given how this is impacting the friendship of Bingley & Darcy.

I do wonder why it doesn't seem to occur to Darcy that he owes Lizzy, or even Charles, at least a passing remark to explain his numerous outings with Miss Cornish, given the fact that he has been openly attempting to win Lizzy's good opinion and favor since her arrival in London. How can he be unaware of the way it looks to the world that he is courting Miss Cornish?

I'm looking forward to seeing all of this cleared up. This is a great way to give Lizzy the opportunity for her Hunsford moment/personal growth, for Darcy to learn to communicate better, and for both of them to learn how to trust each other.

I don't know that Mrs. Gardiner would be a lot of help in this situation, as she is just slightly acquainted with Darcy at this point, but despite Elizabeth's reasoning to the contrary, she would have done better to have talked to Jane and Bingley about it. She doesn't think it could have helped anything, but she might be wrong.

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Oh, and WOW Darcy was out of line and out of his mind to imply that, of all her sisters, Lizzy only loves Jane, and that she merely feigned affection for the others! While it is true she loves and likes her London family most dearly, and that her excuse of homesickness was rather transparent, he needed a solid bop on the head for that arrogant, cutting claim.

As I've indicated in previous comments, it was a goal of mine to push Darcy out of his enforced politeness. He can't always be going around afraid of offending her. Sometimes the only way to do that is to make him really angry, angry enough to be rude.

Ailish:

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I really have to wonder if so many people would be defending Darcy, and imo harshly judging Lizzy, without the benefit of previously knowing these characters, ie if Mr Darcy wasn't Mr Darcy. Looking at this story alone, the man is *not* coming off spectacularly. Even Bingley was angry at his earlier behaviour, tbh if I were Lizzy I don't think I'd trust him either.

Of course, we are influenced by our prior knowledge of these characters. You do have to give him credit for many weeks of good behavior, though. He did everything he could to display his good character to her, up until the Miss Cornish thing came up, and even then he wasn't doing anything wrong.

Michelle Anne:

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Perhaps not defending Darcy, but chastising Elizabeth. From what she knows, he's been playing her (and two other women) making him unworthy of her affection and notice. In her mind, she her snub is justifiable. However, she loses some sympathy with her silence. She's created a tense situation in her current home and hasn't made the slimmest attempt to hear Darcy's story.

With her silence, Darcy is unaware of Elizabeth's "findings" or feelings, her sudden defection creating confusion and anger. Unlike Elizabeth, however, Darcy made an attempt to discover the cause of Elizabeth's changed behavior. In this little skirmish, at least, Darcy comes across much better.

This is a very good summary of the situation!

Kent:

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He comes off quite well now. He has very evidently reformed, as Lizzy acknowledges to herself.

If he is courting Miss Cornish, good for him -- Lizzy has turned him away over and over for months (alternating with no-doubt bewildering sessions of flirting). She told him she didn't want him. As recently as the end of chapter 7 she made a point to try to squash any idea he might be getting that she thought of him romantically.

If Darcy is courting Miss C, then he has done nothing wrong since he left Netherfield (unless he really is engaged to Miss DeBourgh and is taking all the young ladies for a ride on the heart-break express).

You're completely right. To be fair to Elizabeth, her attempt to squash his hopes was based on good motives. She wasn't yet sure if she cared enough for him to marry him, and so she was trying not to lead him on. Her natural flirtatiousness--and the real attractions she was feeling for him--just ran away with her tongue for a moment.

Diana:

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I can't help but wonder, when reading stories such as this, if my loved ones were equally appalled and frustrated at my lack of understanding during a particularly bad breakup in my early 20s, which in retrospect was doomed and foolish from the get go.

Can someone lock them in a library or something? They'll either make up, of only one will emerge alive (let's be real, it would be Elizabeth). Or maybe stage a Regency style intervention.

It's always so much easier to see clearly when you're outside a situation, isn't it?

While I'm not going to lock them in a library, exactly, just wait a few chapters, and I don't think you'll be disappointed.

UnbirthdayGirl:

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Oh dear me! This is unbearable. Must go read some of your fluff to calm my poor nerves! Xx

I rather pride myself on my fluff. winking smiley Thanks!

Kimberly:

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This prospect made me feel bleaker than ever... until Monday, I dare hope?

Monday, I promise!

EvelynJean:

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Oh, your writing is amazing! Yes, there are things to blame both Darcy and Elizabeth, but my thoughts go to Bingley and Jane right now, in the way they chose to allow Elizabeth to avoid explaining herself in any way. I believe that Elizabeth and Darcy are not the only ones who will learn something out of this in the end, as I hope that the Bingleys also learn that perhaps they should be more forthright and questioning and stop ignoring the tense situation (don't they think that their own better understanding of the situation could be important?) So many placess to put the blame and for feeling sorry for them all at the same time.

Oh, your story is amazing and surely keeps us wanting more and holding on tight to get to the next posting! Thank you for the gift of your writing!!

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Another thought: It strikes me that Lizzy has made this such a tangled web in not trusting her conclusions to anyone else, not even her beloved Aunt Gardner. Such secretiveness will only make things so much worse, has already. Now I'm sure the Bingleys think they cannot trust Darcy at all; how else they could think at this point?

Cannot wait to see the truth of everything unfold. Thank you again for the pleasure and torture of reading your story.

As far as Jane and Bingley go, I'm trying to follow the lead of Jane Austen, whose characters always seem remarkably reluctant to inquire into the affairs of other characters, even ones they're very close to. Jane believes firmly that Elizabeth would not do anything really wrong, and while Bingley might feel somewhat protective of her, he doesn't think it's his place to ask her private business. They can see something is going on between her and Darcy, but at this point it's not really any of their business. Bingley will ask her, next chapter, if Darcy's done anything to impose on her or harm her, but ultimately, if she doesn't want to talk about it, they're not going to make her.

Nadia:

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Oh my! I hope this will end soon! I mean all this tension and unhappiness. I'm waiting for Elizabeth to explode and accuse Darcy of everything. Was hoping she would do that in the garden. No I'm afraid if he loves her enough to try again in spite of her desire not to talk to him and explain herself.
She definitely loves him already! How else can she be so hurt?
Thank you for the wonderful chapter! And the waltz! I hope they will have opportunity to have another one in better circumstances.

Of course she loves him already. winking smiley She managed to talk to Wickham with perfect composure after he was exposed to her (in canon), so there's a reason she can't manage the same with Darcy.

The garden was probably not the best place for an explosion. I have a better one in mind. smiling smiley

Thank you all! Love all the comments! Chapter 11 will be worth reading, I promise.
SubjectAuthorPosted

The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Suzanne OOctober 21, 2016 02:25PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Lucy J.October 23, 2016 06:12AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Suzanne OOctober 24, 2016 12:56AM

replies

Suzanne OOctober 23, 2016 02:54AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

NadiaOctober 22, 2016 06:39AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

EvelynJeanOctober 22, 2016 04:51AM

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EvelynJeanOctober 22, 2016 05:06AM

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KimberlyOctober 21, 2016 11:38PM

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UnbirthdayGirlOctober 21, 2016 11:29PM

Alias

Amy I.October 22, 2016 04:25AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Diana TOctober 21, 2016 11:13PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

GioiaOctober 21, 2016 07:28PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

GioiaOctober 21, 2016 07:40PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

KarenteaOctober 21, 2016 08:30PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

AilishOctober 21, 2016 10:06PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Michelle AnneOctober 22, 2016 01:26AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

KentOctober 22, 2016 01:14AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

KarenteaOctober 21, 2016 11:18PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Tessa LOctober 22, 2016 03:01AM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

LizzySOctober 21, 2016 08:07PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

SarahC.October 21, 2016 07:27PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

DevriesOctober 21, 2016 07:01PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

BubbleblueOctober 21, 2016 06:34PM

Alias

Amy I.October 22, 2016 05:37PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

SabineC.October 21, 2016 06:07PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

terachanOctober 21, 2016 05:55PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

LizzySOctober 21, 2016 05:53PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

JanetROctober 21, 2016 05:45PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

KarenteaOctober 21, 2016 04:55PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Diana TOctober 21, 2016 10:52PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

KarenteaOctober 21, 2016 08:27PM

Stairs analogy: well put! (nfm) (nfm)

SabineC.October 22, 2016 12:53PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

KentOctober 21, 2016 03:57PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

gioOctober 21, 2016 03:40PM

Re: The Way It Ought to Be, Chapter 10

Tessa LOctober 21, 2016 02:54PM



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