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Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

May 08, 2016 03:11PM
I think you have something, there, Jim.

However, and seem always a "but," I see the possibility of a lot of defects going past a proofreader, assuming that was a step in the process between an author(ess) submitting a manuscript, and the book coming off the presses. A penmanship manuscript can be a bit of a bother to sort out some defects. As I have looked at late-18th and early 19th century documents, it is easy to see where a quill pen glitched, changing a period into a comma, or a multitude of other defects.

Then too, writing styles have changed from verbose, to briefer, c. about the time of the telegraph, and even briefer now, with twitter. A printed paragraph running pages long, especially with vision impairments, really get up my nose. The P&P file that I got from this site, I went through and broke up some of those long paragraphs where the subject seemed to change. Having an "eye break" help me a lot. Of course, a proper grammer nazi could cite incomplete paragraphs, but that is a more tolerable defect than wondering when come an eyebreak so I can put in a bookmark.

Editing the file also got some apparent typos corrected. It is another "cold eye" edit pass. A typo could have been done during typesetting.

Ideas? Confirmations or corrections?



"The avalanche has started. It is too late for the pebbles to vote." -Ambassador Kosh Naranek
SubjectAuthorPosted

" You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 08, 2016 01:38PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

KentMay 10, 2016 07:06PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Suzanne OMay 10, 2016 02:54PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 10, 2016 06:20PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Suzanne OMay 10, 2016 07:48PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 10, 2016 10:09PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Agnes BeatrixMay 09, 2016 11:23AM

English/Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Rae ElaineMay 10, 2016 11:56PM

Re: English

Mari A.May 11, 2016 06:59AM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Sarah WaldockMay 09, 2016 07:49PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 09, 2016 11:07PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Agnes BeatrixMay 10, 2016 06:44AM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

PeterMay 09, 2016 04:39PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 09, 2016 02:07PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

RebeccaLSMay 08, 2016 03:59PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 08, 2016 06:28PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jean M.May 08, 2016 05:48PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Rae ElaineMay 09, 2016 12:48AM

But Darcy doesn't know that about the Gardiners at that point in the novel.

GracielaMay 09, 2016 07:01PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 09, 2016 11:04AM

This has always been my interpretation as well. (nfm)

PeterMay 09, 2016 12:08AM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Rae ElaineMay 08, 2016 03:11PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

MichelleAMay 08, 2016 05:37PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 08, 2016 10:48PM

Re: I read it that way too, Michelle (nfm)

Sarah WaldockMay 08, 2016 07:46PM

Re: " You cannot have been always at longbourn!"

Jim G.MMay 08, 2016 06:57PM



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