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Writing for Reading

March 14, 2015 06:32PM
Jane Austen wrote with long winded sentences and long, run on paragraphs. That may have worked with the grammar at the time, printed on paper, and a culture that has more time and less stress.

Nowadays, it could be amusing -to- informative to have a WAG at how much we read on a screen v.s. on a dead tree. Either way, a few ideas can make reading easier, especially for us old bats who are blind in one eye and cannot see out of the other.
One) A broken paragraph is probabley easier to wade through than one which should have been split. I have taken my text copies of P&P, S&S, and Emma and split several paragraphs at optimal places. Of course, such addition edits should be bracketed [ ]. If the paragraph, take more than a screen, it may have a break point. If a sentence wrap more than about 6 or seven lines (Pica 10 pitch, 65 char/line), then look for a run on.

Two) Dialogue is a big stinker when run on into more than one speaker per paragraph. In fact, one speaker may need a break. (see # 1). That speaker may pause, shift their weight, snigger inappropriately, &.

Three) Alike #2, the tag team partner in dialogue need their own paragraph, and a TAG. A tag identify who speak and how it is said. More than two speakers, as in a conversation -to- rhubarb, almost always need tagged for every speaker ID, unless it is plain that two talkers carry the load and a third, who will need ID'd when they interject; "Bovine Scat."

Four) Have no more than two complete sentences in a speaker paragraph, and that is for some setup. Set the scene &c. in previous paragraphs, so that conversation read like hearing a conversation.

Am sure many more helps can be identified. These four are a good start. Ideas?



"The avalanche has started. It is too late for the pebbles to vote." -Ambassador Kosh Naranek
SubjectAuthorPosted

Writing for Reading

Rae ElaineMarch 14, 2015 06:32PM

Re: Writing for Reading

RedsonMarch 18, 2015 03:55PM

Re: Writing for Reading

Suzanne OMarch 20, 2015 04:46AM

Re: Writing for Reading

Jim D.March 20, 2015 07:30AM

Re: Writing for Reading

Suzanne OMarch 23, 2015 12:09AM

Re: Writing for Reading

RedsonMarch 23, 2015 03:08AM

Re: Writing for Reading

Harvey S.March 17, 2015 03:39AM

Re: Writing for Reading

Jim D.March 17, 2015 02:37PM

Re: Writing for Reading

Suzanne OMarch 17, 2015 02:29PM

Re: Writing for Reading

Jean M.March 17, 2015 03:35PM

Re: Writing for Reading

AlidaMarch 17, 2015 08:24AM

Re: Writing for Reading

GingerMarch 17, 2015 03:37AM

Re: Writing for Reading

AlidaMarch 15, 2015 07:41PM

Re: Writing for Reading

laurie lMarch 17, 2015 12:24PM

Re: Writing for Reading

Jim D.March 16, 2015 06:17AM

Evokes the era or our concept of the era?

KathyMarch 21, 2015 03:19PM

Re: Writing for Reading

Jim G.MMarch 15, 2015 09:44PM



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